(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Proceedings of the stockholders of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company at their ... annual meeting ..."

PROCEEDINGS OF THE STOCKHOLDERS AT THEIR 
ANNUAL MEETING 

Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad Company 






%, > i 



* 



la 



S*JwB! 






' r 



nv 






JNorth Carolina State Libi 
Raleigh 

PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



STOCKHOLDERS 



OF THE 



Columbia and l«psfa pilroatl fontpanjr, 



AT THEIR 



FIRST ANNUAL MEETING, 



HELD AT 



Augusta, April 20, 1870. 



Also, the Annual Reports of the President, Superintendent, Treasurer, k. 



COLUMBIA, S. C. : 

PRINTED AT THE PHCENIX AND GLEANER PUBLISHING HOUSE. 

1870. 



*9l 



\ f 



o 









{'/ 



I 






PEOCEEDING8. 



The stockholders of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Rail- 
road held their first annual Convention at the City Hall, in Augusta, 
on Wednesday, April 20, 1870. 

Hon. J. V. H. Allen was chosen permanent presiding officer of 
the Convention. 

Messrs. C. H. Manson and C. P. Hyde were requested to act as 
Secretaries. 

A committee of three on stock and proxies was appointed, con- 
sisting of J. P. Southern, A. H. Davega and J. J. Cohen. 

General Rufus Barringer moved that while the committee was at 
work, the reports of officers be called for and referred to a commit- 
tee of five to report. Carried. 

The Chair appointed the committee provided for under this mo- 
tion, as follows: General Rufus Barringer, Rev. Win. Martin, 
Henry Meyer, John B. Palmer and John A. Bradley. 

Colonel Wm. Johnston, President of the road, read his annual 
report: 

President's Office, 
Charlotte, N. C, April 18, 1870. 
To the Stockholders of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad 
Company. 

Gentlemen : The undersigned has the honor to submit, in behalf 
of the Board of Directors, this the first annual report of the Com- 
pany. 

The stockholders of the Charlotte and South Carolina and Co- 
lumbia and Augusta Railroad Companies met in separate and gene- 
ral conventions, in Columbia, on the 7th and 8th of July, 1869, and 
upon terms and conditions mutually satisfactory, and with singular 
unanimity, agreed to consolidate their respective interests into one 
corporation — " The Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Com- 
pany." An amended charter, with all necessary legislation for this 



purpose, was obtained from the States of North Carolina, South 
Carolina and Georgia. According to the terms of consolidation, 
the stock of the Charlotte and South Carolina Eailroad was valued 
at par, while 112J of the Columbia and Augusta Railroad made 100 
in the new Company; or one share of the former of 100 was merged 
with 4J shares of the latter of $25 each. These estimates were on 
account of the different values of the currency according to which 
the two roads had been built. The respective liabilities of each — 
the unfinished condition of the one, with a business yet unde- 
veloped — with its entire want of equipment, although having gene- 
rally a superior rail, and the finished condition of the other, with a 
full equipment of shops, depots, engines, coaches and cars. 

After full and mature discussion of these different subjects before 
joint committees, and in separate and joint conventions of stock- 
holders of the two Companies, this principle of consolidation of 
stock was agreed upon. Each of these corporations then transfer- 
red to the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company all 
their respective rights and property, upon condition that it should 
assume all their respective liabilities. 

Upon the organization of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta 
Railroad Company, it was unanimously resolved by the stockholders, 
" that in consideration of the transfer to said Company, by the 
Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad Company, and by the Co- 
lumbia and Augusta Railroad Company, of all the property of the 
said two Companies, respectively, the said Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad Company do hereby assume the payment of all 
the debts and liabilities of the said two Companies, respectively, 
and the performance of all contracts by either of said Companies 
undertaken and yet remaining to be performed; and the faith and 
credit, resources and property of the said Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad Company are hereby pledged for the payment of 
all such debts and liabilities, and the performance of all such con- 
tracts." 

This completed the terms of consolidation, and the stockholders 
immediately thereafter, with the view of fulfilling the conditions, 
authorized the President and Directors to issue bonds of this Com- 
pany "to an amount not exceeding $2,100,000, to be used for the 
purpose of funding the floating debt, and retiring the bonds hereto- 
fore issued by the said two Companies, respectively, and now out- 
standing, and for the purpose of completing the construction and 



5 

outfit of the road to Augusta, and for other purposes; and to se- 
cure the payment of said bonds hereby authorized to be issued, the 
said President and Directors are further authorized and empowered 
to execute a mortgage of the Kailroad, and of the property and 
franchises of this Company, or of any part thereof — the said bonds 
and mortgage to be signed, attested and otherwise executed in such 
manner as the President and Directors shall direct." 

For the purpose of avoiding, in any reasonable contingency, the 
necessity in future of a second mortgage, the authority was made 
more ample as to the amount of bonds than the then existing lia- 
bilities of the Company required. 

In conformity, however, with the foregoing resolution, your Di- 
rectors have caused a mortgage to be executed, with an authority 
to issue not exceeding $2,000,000 of first mortgage bonds. These 
bonds bear seven per centum interest, payable semi-annually at the 
Agency of the Company, in the city of New York, and mature on 
the 1st of January, 1895. They are handsomely engraved and well 
executed, and are very freely received in exchange for the two 
classes of bonds heretofore issued by the former respective compa- 
nies, for the reasons that they are more amply secured than either 
of those bonds, by the value of the property mortgaged and the in- 
creased business of the road. In like manner, the exchange and 
consolidation of the stock of the late corporations is being cheer- 
fully and freely made by the holders for the stock of this Company. 

This brief outline, of the formation of this Company and its sub- 
sequent acts in carrying out the directions of the stockholders, will 
enable you the better to understand the following statement of re- 
ceipts and expenditures to which your attention is invited. (See A. ) 

As consolidation did not take place until the 8th of July, 1869, 
the accounts of the former companies were necessarily kept separate 
and distinct, and were so continued until the end of that month, for 
obvious reasons. 

The gross earnings are $403,785 49 

The operating expenses are 225,996 59 

Leaving the net earnings $177,788 90 

Or about 44 per centum of the gross earnings. 
You will, however, readily perceive, from the foregoing synopsis, 
that for only five months of the fiscal year which terminated on the 



31st of December last, the receipts of this Company were $218,- 
798.03, or $33,87 0.57 more than the aggregate receipts for seven 
months of the two former companies; while the expenses of this 
Company for the five months were only $105,113.05, or about 48 
per centum of expenditure to 52 of net earnings. If from the 
$105,113.05 you deduct the taxes paid and embraced of $23,000, it 
reduces the expense account to $82,113.05; or about 38 J per centum 
to 61J of net earnings. As appears from the above statement, the 
receipts on the Augusta division are small. This was owing to the 
fact that only a portion of the road was finished at the beginning 
of the year, and the country along its line was not developed and 
made tributary to its transportation. The results, however, on this 
portion of the road for the last six months are most gratifying; 
new life and energy appear to be imparted to the country, and its 
business relations with the road are rapidly increasing. 

The net earnings of the Company during the year have been ap- 
plied to the payment of debts, interest, equipment and the comple- 
tion of the bridge across the Savannah River, as will fully appear 
by the accounts and vouchers of the Treasurer. While the Super- 
intendent's Report (herewith submitted) shows the ordinary ex- 
penses in the several departments. 

Considering the condition of the property for seven months of 
the year, the tonnage of the road, its cheap through rates of freights 
and tickets, it is believed its administration for economy will com- 
pare favorably with that of any other road in the country. It is 
the amount of business as well as the rate of charge that yields 
profit. Much of the tonnage now transported is of the cheaper 
classes, and is a source of less profit than that of former times. 
While the resources of the cotton regions of the South have been 
materially diminished by the resnlts of the late war, the transporta- 
tion necessary for the country has essentially increased in the cheap 
and heavy articles of freights. This is owing to the higher price of 
cotton, inviting the capital and labor more exclusively to its cultiva- 
tion than at any other former period. Hence the production of 
corn, wheat and other cereals, domestic cloths of many kinds, and 
raising hogs, sheep, cattle and other animals of domestic economy, 
have been partially abandoned. These deficiencies of food and rai- 
ment, as well as implements of husbandry, have therefore to be sup- 
plied from the North and West. The inhabitants of the cotton 
States export nearly all they produce and import nearly all they 



consume, and hence the increase in the tonnage of transportation. 
In no one year of our history have so much corn, bacon, flour, 
guano and so many agricultural implements been imported into the 
Southern States, as during the last twelve months. And this great 
expenditure for necessaries will probably continue in defiance of all 
theories, while the cultivation of cotton promises greater rewards 
than other industrial pursuits. 

The property of the Company has been well maintained, and 
large additions made to it. Four locomotives have been purchased 
since your last meeting, and extensive repairs made on those hereto- 
fore in use. Forty freight cars have been constructed in the shops, 
and seven passenger and mail coaches, besides other improvements, 
making an addition of about one hundred thousand dollars in value 
added to equipment. 

Three other new locomotives have been contracted for, one to be 
delivered in May, and the others in October next. 

It is contemplated to construct about forty cars additional, and 
several more passenger coaches, when it is believed the equipment 
will be ample for the demands of transportation. 

Owing to the excessive drought of last summer, the difficulty of 
procuring lumber, limited number of cars and heavy transportation 
of materials for the construction of the Savannah bridge, the road 
was not able fully to meet the expectations of its patrons on the 
Augusta division. The greatest inconveniences on this account 
were experienced at Augusta and Pine House. It is contemplated 
during the summer to enlarge the freight and passenger accommoda- 
tions at both of these places, as well as at other points, to insure 
greater facilities to all patrons. 

The litigation between the South Carolina Railroad Company and 
the Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company has been amicably 
and satisfactorily settled. Your trains now enter Augusta on the 
bridge of the South Carolina Railroad, by arrangements with that 
Company. Your bridge across the Savannah River is making rea- 
sonable progress, considering the difficulties of getting proper 
foundations for its piers in the bed of the river, and the excessive 
freshets encountered during the winter. It is expected to be finished 
in August next. Capt. H. F. Bardwell, Chief Engineer in charge, 
is a gentleman of great industry and long experience in his profes- 
sion. 

The subject of taxation is becoming one of vital importance to 



8 

the railroad interests of the country. It is now oppressive in the 
highest degree. The Federal Government levies a tax, first, of 5 
per centum on the net income; second, a tax of two and one-half 
per centum on the gross receipts from passengers; and, third, a tax 
of 5 per centum on the cost of all engines, cars and tools manu- 
factured; with a tariff varying from thirty to sixty per centum on 
all rails, steel, iron and other materials imported. In addition to 
this, come the. State and County taxes of North and South Carolina, 
amounting to more than one per centum on the entire property of 
the Company, on which is placed a valuation in some instances 
amounting to double the price it would bring in open market. 
These various taxes, amounting to the sum of forty-four thousand 
five hundred and sixty dollars and twenty cents, ($44,560.20,) have 
been paid by your Company during the current year, equal to more 
than one-fourth of your net income. It is difficult to conceive of a 
free government, intended to be administered solely for the benefit of 
the people, becoming so oppressive in its exactions upon the mate- 
rial interests of the country. No species of property contributes 
so much to develop resources and create wealth as railroads. No 
railroad constructed fifty miles in length, and properly maintained 
for five years, fails to impart more value to the section through 
which it passes than its first cost — thus creating new and additional 
revenues to the State. Hence, under former administrations, this 
species of property received the fostering care and protection of the 
State — taxes being often levied to construct them, while they were 
wholly exempt from burdens of this kind. It is some relief, how- 
ever, to see that the recent Legislature of North Carolina has re- 
duced the taxes of the current year to about one-half of what they 
were the past twelve months. It is hoped that a like spirit of jus- 
tice and economy may inspire the Legislature of South Carolina to 
similar action. If the whole amount of taxes paid during the year 
had gone into net revenue instead of expense, the result would have 
been, for ordinary expenses, $181,976.39, and net income $221,- 
908.10, or about 45 of expense to 55 of net income. 

This Company owns twenty thousand dollars of stock in the At- 
lantic, Tennessee and Ohio Railroad, familiarly known as the Char- 
lotte and Statesville Road, of forty-six and one-half miles in length. 
In the year 1863, the Confederate authorities dismantled the road, 
by removing the rails, chairs and spikes to the Piedmont and other 
railroads deemed to be of greater military importance. This was 



about thirteen mouths after its trains had successfully and profit- 
ably run from Charlotte to Statesville. The road-bed, bridges, 
depots and other property have remained as left in 1863, except the 
ordinary waste and decay, which have been comparatively slight. 
The entire country along its fertile and populous line is very desi- 
rous to rebuild the road, and it has been proposed by many promi- 
nent stockholders, that it be submitted to this Company to rebuild 
the road on terms to be agreed upon between the two Companies, 
either by consolidation or otherwise. Although the Company has 
probably one hundred thousand dollars over all its liabilities, it is 
unable to rebuild and equip the road without co-operation. It is 
respectfully submitted, that you appoint a committee, or invest your 
Directors with power to negotiate with a similar committee, or with 
the Directors of that Company, on the subject. And notwithstand- 
ing the pecuniary necessities of your own road, it is believed, with 
the cordial co-operation of Iredell and Mecklenburg Counties, and 
the city of Charlotte, it can be rebuilt and made profitable to its 
stockholders, and useful to your road and the entire country through 
which it passes. 

Although many obstacles had to be surmounted in reconstructing 
and equipping the Charlotte division, so utterly destroyed by war, 
and in building the Augusta division, since 1865, under greater diffi- 
culties, yet your Directors think there is cause of congratulation 
that you have 195 miles of road occupying so commanding a posi- 
tion, connecting the grain and tobacco regions with the cotton 
States. A road whose business is not likely to be seriously affected 
by the construction of any other road now contemplated, and whose 
connections both North of Charlotte and South of Augusta are 
rapidly progressing, and destined greatly to augment its already in- 
creasing tide of trade and travel. With a fertile and populous 
country extending from Ealeigh to Asheville, a distance of more 
than 200 miles, at its Northern terminus, and from Atlanta to Sa- 
vannah, a distance of nearly 300 miles, at its Southern terminus, in 
a great degree tributary to it, with its through connections, North 
to New York and South to Vicksburg and New Orleans; its annual 
income under proper management must soon amount to six or eight 
hundred thousand dollars. 

For more specific information in regard to the various depart- 
ments, and the property generally of the road, and its financial con- 
dition, your attention is invited to the reports of the Superintend- 
2 



10 

ent, the Treasurer and the Master Machinist. These officers, in- 
cluding' the General Freight and Ticket Agent and the Supervisor, 
with the agents and employees generally, have worked earnestly 
and faithfully for the interests of the Company. Indeed, many of 
the officers and agens have, at times, been over-taxed with duties 
and responsibilities, but with a pride of business character and de- 
votion to their obligations, met them without complaint. 
Respectfully submitted. 

WM. JOHNSTON, President. 

The President took occasion to refer to the fact that he had 
unaccountably omitted to state in his report, that Chief Engineer 
J. O. Moore, in consequence of ill health, had resigned his position 
in October last, and that he now took great pleasure in bearing 
testimony to the able and efficient manner in which that officer had 
discharged his arduous duties. 

Colonel F. W. McMaster read the report of C. Bouknight, Super- 
intendent : 

Superintendent's Office, CIiarlotte, Columbia and Augusta R. 11., 

December 31, 1869. 
To the President and Directors of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta 
Railroad Company. 
Gentlemen: In July last, the Charlotte and South Carolina and 
the Columbia and Augusta Railroad Companies, by competent 
action of their stockholders, were united, and now constitute one 
company. 

It is easy of demonstration that it was for their best interests 
and harmony of future operation. An independent management 
would have almost necessarily resulted in diversity of apparent 
interests of each. 

The earnings for the year have been from : 

Freights $188,765 39 

Passengers 199,516 94 

Mails 14,467 48 

Minor Sources !i,035 68 

$403,785 49 



11 

Expenditures on account of road operations are : 

Maintenance Way $ 58,639 44 

Conducting Transportation 50,698 95 

Motive Power 16,524 (52 

Maintenance Cars 6,491 85 

Machine Shops 39,116 66 

Loss, Damage and Deductions 2,140 27 

Over-charges 284 23 

Through Passenger Line 1,540 37 

Tax Paid— State and United States 44,560 20 

$225,996 59 

Leaving $177,248.90 for payment of interest and construction 
account of Augusta division. 

The taxes are enormous, being over eleven per cent, of total 
income, and there are indications that they will be increased. Until 
lately, the Company has been exempt from taxation in the city of 
Columbia. The claim will now be pressed, covering large sums 
for water rent and taxes on Company's shops. 

The business of the year indicates a cheerful prospect of a future 
large increase in its receipts and earnings. 

The competition for long freights and through passengers conti- 
nues, and seriously affects the proper and legitimate earnings of 
railroads. 

While our earnings from this class of business have been equal in 
profit to that of other roads, there is no reason why the transporta- 
tion of the great staples of the country should be done at a loss by 
railroads; but just and proper that a reasonable profit should be 
derived from it. 

EOAD. 

The expenditures in this department during the year have been 
large in material and labor. This was necessary in part, because 
of our former disasters by war, in the hasty rebuilding of the track ; 
and also in the fact that our trains have been increased in number, 
speed and weight. It is believed that comparative liberal expendi- 
ture on the track is good economy. The ditching has been thorough 
on the Charlotte division, and much earth-w T ork done on Augusta 
division, in increasing new embankments and widening the cuts. 
Two trains were employed nearly the whole year in this work, and 
a large portion of the time on Augusta division. A large quantity 



12 

of earth has been moved in vicinity of Dead Fall. The new em- 
bankments were easily carried away by the heavy rain storms which 
came upon them on three or four noted occasions during the year. 

These have been much increased in width and strength, long and 
deep ditches cut in side hills, by which the volumes of descending 
water have been diverted and divided. 

There is yet much work of this class to be done on this division 
of the road, and it will be necessary to keep our trains and hands 
constantly employed in filling in earth at various points where tres- 
tles are now located. 

The culverts and water ways require enlargement, and stone 
covering and sides at many points. 

The trestles at Graniteville and Shaw's Creek are deserving early 
attention. These should be filled up, stone walls built, and short 
span bridges thrown over them. 

During the dry period last fall, our water tanks and means of 
supply were much increased, and can be easily kept equal to our 
increasing wants. 

There is yet much to be done to prepare the roadway for the 
quick and safe movements of heavy trains, which we hope will be 
profitably and successfully taken over the road. 

Since July, by agreement, this Company has been using the track 
and bridge of the South Carolina Kailroad between Dead Fall and 
Augusta. 

Our material and irregular trains have been often delayed at this 
point, because of the numerous locomotives which were generally in 
use upon this portion of the road. 

Soon it is believed our track and bridge over Savannah River will 
be ready for our trains. 

The large proportion of material used in road repairs was 
expended on Charlotte division. About 54,000 ties and 7,500 
stringers were placed in road during the year, making near twenty- 
six miles of ties and fifteen miles of stringers. 

The stringer line has been kept in good order, which has required 
a good force of hands for each section. The most defective rails 
were replaced by better ones and new sleeve chairs at the joints. 

In this connection, I beg to ask your attention to the matter of 
renewal of rails of this class as early as the means of the Company, 
or its prospective succeess, may in prudence warrant it. 

Extensive passenger platforms have been built at Graniteville, 



13 

Pine House, Johnston's, Ridge Spring, Batesville, and some enlarged 
at Columbia and Charlotte. 

New platforms have been made at "Woodward's, Cornwell's, 
Smith's and other places on the line. Additional side tracks put in 
at Charlotte, turn-outs at Woodward's and Adams'. 

The wells and water tanks have been renewed and improved at 
Chester and Woodward's. 

Our bridges are all in good condition. The bridge over Steel 
Creek has been thoroughly renewed — that at Gervais street, Colum- 
bia, well repaired. Material and substantial improvements have 
been made on Catawba Bridge. It would be well to cover more 
securely this bridge. 

Much needed work would have been done, which was prevented 
or delayed for want of lumber. The long drought of last fall pre- 
vented the working of the mills for some months. 

As soon as can be done, the depot will be built at W T oodward's; 
that at Rock Hill will also receive early attention. It wants to be 
enlarged and renewed pretty extensively. 

Experience demonstrates that our freight depot accommodations 
are too small, especially at Columbia, Pine House, Johnston's, 
Batesville and other points; but these are first in degree of neces- 
sity. The business at Pine House in fertilizers has been unexpect- 
edly large. In order to protect and shelter it as the Company wish 
to do, our storage accommodations must be enlarged extensively; 
as early as the profits and means of the Company could warrant, a 
small house for accommodation of passengers should be built here 
also. The patronage of an extensive and comparatively productive 
section of country is accessible at this station. 

By permission of the City Council of Augusta and of the Georgia 
Railroad, we have secured a convenient track for our passenger 
trains on East side of Union depot. 

During the year, we have built section house at Guignard's, Pine 
House, Johnston's, Bath Mills, and propose to build early in next 
year section houses at Simpson's, Lexington, Dead Fall, and increase 
their size at other points. 

Any expenditures in this direction, by which we may make our 
laborers more settled and comfortable, will increase its efficiency 
and reliability. 

The wages of labor have increased during the year. It is unset- 
tled and unreliable. It is believed to be the interest of railroads to 
encourage emigrant labor. 



14 

CARS. 

As contemplated last year, our stock of cars and coaches have 
been largely increased. 

We have built twenty box and twenty platform cars at our shops, 
and ten others nearly ready for use. Two fine coaches, two second 
class coaches and three mail cars were constructed during the year. 

It may be necessary, however, and has been so ordered by the 
President, still to increase the number of our coaches and cars, as 
well as maintain the efficiency of the present number. The cost 
of construction has been less than if purchased from the manufac- 
turers, and equally as well done. 

"We have contributed five box cars to the Green Line service, and 
may five more, if the business warrants it. 

Our stock of cars consists of: 
6 first class coaches. 
5 second class coaches. 
5 mail cars. 

16 

79 box cars. 

8 stock cars. 
49 platform cars. 

136 

And a number of shanty and road cars. We have built a paint 
shop, which covers two cars, and is well suited to our uses. 

MOTIVE POWER. 

By active efforts, this department has met the demands upon it. 
No accident of a damaging, character has befallen any one of our 
machines. The speed and number of the trains have been increased. 
Much work in the finishing up on Augusta division has been done, 
in moving earth, lumber, stone, &c. The locomotives in shops at 
time of last report have been in good order and put to work, and 
are doing us good service. 

The DuBose, which is being built entire by us, will be ready for 
work soon. She will be neatly and tastefully finished, having all 
modern improvements in her machinery and construction. When 
placed in service, it is proposed to name her the "Lexington." 

The Company owns now eighteen locomotives, and the Wm. 
Wright, which is a condemned machine, but will be so repaired as 



15 

to supply us for a road engine. Of this number, four were pur- 
chased during the year; sixteen are in active use. At some points, 
it has been found difficult to keep up a supply of wood, even where 
reliable contracts had been made for it. 

MACHINE SHOPS 

Have been kept in good order and constant work. All needful 
work on locomotives, cars and vast quantities of iron and wood 
work, required for the road in the construction of our division, and 
heavy repairs of the other, have been quickly and cheaply supplied 
from our shops. During the year, our stock of tools was somewhat 
increased, and also the number of hands. While the demands upon 
it have, therefore, been promptly and satisfactorily met, it will be a 
real necessity to purchase more tools, and furnish additional shop 
room. 

As the number of locomotives may be increased, and the road 
operations and business enlarges, so the demands for power and 
help from this service. 

It will be necessary to purchase three or four locomotives to keep 
up with our business, and supply power for road operations. 

FOUNDRY 

Has been kept up, supplying all the castings of brass and iron 
needed in repairs of engines, cars, &c, and also a large number of 
car wheels, which we find to wear well, which is the test of success. 
In thus furnishing our castings, we do it more cheaply and promptly 
than if we were dependent upon others. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION. 

Our trains have been run with commendable success. Arrange- 
ments for quick and cheap freights have been improved. Passenger 
schedules and rates have been worked, by which we received a fair 
proportion of public patronage. Our short line, good roadways 
and line coaches, will secure us a large share of the travel in the 
competition for this business. 

In September, a freight train ran upon a cow lying on the track, 
by which several cars were thrown off, the locomotive damaged, 
and the lives of three or four persons were greatly endangered, each 
receiving some personal injury, and the Company sustaining consi- 
derable damage by cars, engine and freights. 

An individual, the owner of the cow, claims pay for the cow at 
the usual extravagant valuation of animals who have the fortune, 
whether good or ill, to be killed by the trains. 



16 

This is only a comparative case of many which are pressed upon 
the Company, with a pertinacity and zeal which give vast annoyance 
and expensive litigation, when efforts have been made to save 
the Company from peculation and loss. 

The facility with which suits are now brought in ♦magistrates' 
courts make it necessary to send our engineers and train hands as 
witnesses in defence, at great inconvenience to the service and loss 
of time. In many instances, the greedy claimants procure enor- 
mous valuations, and find ready verdicts for such assessments. 

No engineer would willingly endanger his train and his own life 
by recklessly running ov<fer stock. The Company has the right to 
use its road in way and manner authorized by its charter, and it is 
claimed that this does not require that a fireman or pilot should be 
kept ahead (on foot) of the locomotive to "clear the track." 

Attention has been given to the order of the Board to regu- 
late and modify, within prudential limits, the free pass system. 
This has been a difficult duty; it is a hard matter to determine its 
limits. This privilege or courtesy is so prone to abuse, that its 
useful and proper provinces are not well defined, and a remedy is 
almost despaired of. It will be our effort to curtail its present 
great proportions. 

In addition to the matter of increasing the size of machine shops, 
so forcibly presented by our Master Mechanic, it is desirable to 
increase our round house, or some other protection for our locomo- 
tives; the shelter is not now sufficient to protect our machines from 
exposure to the weather. 

In this connection, I beg respectfully to refer to my report last 
year, as to want of proper protection for office papers — passenger 
sheds at Charlotte and Columbia. It is, however, matter of far more 
concern that the roadway should be maintained in good condition, 
whereby the safety of the trains and the Company's property is 
preserved and its elaim to the public patronage assured. 

The annual tabular statements, prepared by the Financial 
Bureau, are also handed herewith, showing in systematic and care- 
ful preparation the monthly receipts from freights, passengers, 
mails, &c. 

The agents, conductors, engineers and others have generally done 
well, most of them discharging their duties with zeal and intelli- 
gence, in the midst of dust, grease and danger, and I cheerfully 
accord all such this commendation. 



fsjoiw, -'•-"» "*^« , K. 



17 

The machinery and motive power departments are in charge of 
Mr. Kline, whose undivided energy and skill are now, as hereto- 
fore, given to his work. 

In the roadway, Mr. B. F. Burns serves with satisfaction and 
success, and I am much indebted to these gentlemen for whatever 
of despatch and safety has so pleasingly attended the operations of 
the road. 

We are indebted to the prompt liberality of the South Carolina 
Road for the use of their track by our trains between Graniteville 
and Dead Fall, when ours was obstructed by slides of earth, or 
culverts injured by floods. 

C. BOUKNIGHT, Superintendent. 

The reading of the reports of the Chief Engineer, Treasurer, &c, 
was dispensed with. 

The Committee on Stock and Proxies, having reported that 
12,795 shares constituted a majority of the stock, and that 13,375 
shares were present, the Chairman announced the Convention duly 
organized for business. 

Mr. W. A. Walker moved that a Committee of Seven be appointed 
to nominate Directors for the ensuing year. 

Dr. F. S. Lewie, Director, respectfully declined to allow his name 
used as a candidate for re-election. 

The motion of Mr. Walker was then put and adopted, the Chair 
appointing the following Committee on Nominations : W. A. Walker, 
John U. Meyer, John M. Potts, John L. Morehead, Wm. B. Stanley, 
Dr. F. S. Lewie and Geo. H. McMaster. 

Colonel J. H. Rion offered the following resolutions: 

Resolved, That all persons holding stock in the Charlotte and 
South Carolina Railroad, or in the Columbia and Augusta Railroad, 
be requested to have the same changed to stock in the Charlotte, 
Columbia and Augusta Railroad, at an early day. 

Resolved, That the privilege of free transportation for stockholders 
and their families, to and from our annual meeting, be hereafter 
extended to the holders of stock in the Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad only. 

Resolved, That no stock be allowed representation at any future 
stockholders' meeting, except stock in the Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad. 
3 



18 

The resolutions, after a lengthy discussion, in which Messrs. 
Bradley, Quattlebaum, Eobertson, Kion, McLure and Johnston 
participated, were put to vote and adopted seriatim. 

The Committee on Officers' Reports submitted the following; 
which was adopted: 

The committee on the reports of the several officers of the Com- 
pany, beg leave to report, that they have had the same under con- 
sideration, and find the numerous matters therein treated, fairly and 
correctly stated, so far as they have been able to ascertain, and they 
recommend that the said reports be accepted and adopted. 

The only points that the committee deem it necessary to call to 
the special attention of the stockholders, are those that relate to the 
taxation of railroads and the rebuilding of the Atlantic, Tennessee 
and Ohio Railroad. 

The committee suggest the rest of these matters be left to the 
sound discretion of the Board of Directors, with the recommenda- 
tion that committees be appointed by the Board to consider the 
questions referred to, and take such action as they may deem just 
and proper. 

The committee, however, think it proper to say that the first and 
highest present duty of this Company is to its stockholders, and 
they hope that no enterprise outside of the immediate operations of 
the road will be undertaken by the Company so as to interfere with 
the early declaration of dividends. Respectfully submitted, 

RTJFUS BARRINGER, Chairman. 

The Committee on Nominations for Directors reported as follows: 

The committee appointed to nominate Directors for the Company 
recommend the following gentlemen. Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. WALKER, Chairman. 

Directors from Georgia. 

W. E. Jackson, 

Josiah Sibley, 

J. J. Cohen, 

S. D. Heard. 

From North Carolina. 

Wm. Johnston, 

A. B. Davidson, 

J. Harvey Wilson, 

Rufus Barringer. 



19 

From Lexington, S. G. 

Paul Quattlebaum. 

From Richland, S. G. 

C. D. Melton, 

John Fisher, 

Edward Hope, 

F. W. McMaster. 

From Fairfield, S. G. 

W. R. Robertson, 

J. H. Rion. 

From Chester, S. G. 

J. J. McLure, 

G. J. Patterson. 

From York, S. G. 

A. B. Springs. 

J. V. H. Allen, ex-officio Mayor, Augusta, Ga. 

On motion, the Convention proceeded to ballot for Directors, and 
the vote having been counted, the nominees were declared elected. 

Captain Stanley submitted the following, which, on motion, was 
adopted: 

Columbia, S. C, April 13, 1870. 
The Committee appointed by J. H. "Wilson, Esq., Chairman of 
the first meeting of stockholders, to examine the books and vouchers 
of C. H. Manson, Treasurer of the Charlotte and South Carolina 
and the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company, for 
1869, respectfully beg leave to report, that they have carefully per- 
formed the duty assigned them, and find them correct, every entry 
having its voucher duly authenticated, and we hereby recommend 
that same be received as entirely satisfactory. 

The committee take pleasure in bearing their unanimous testi- 
mony to the efficiency and courtesy of the Treasurer in his official 
duties. 

The books and papers in his department are kept with neatness 
and accuracy. Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. STANLEY, 
A. H. DAVEGA, 
JAMES HEMPHILL, 
Committee. 



20 

Mr. Hope submitted the following, which was adopted: 

To the Stockholders of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad 
Company: 

The undersigned, a committee appointed to examine the books of 
the Treasurer of the Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company, beg 
leave to report, that they have examined the accounts from October 
1, 1868, to December 31, 1869, and find the same to be accurately 
kept, and in very neat and proper style, and the disbursements duly 
vouched. Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. MEETZE, Chairman, 

JOHN J. COHEN, 

EDWARD HOPE. 

General Barringer offered the following, which was unanimously 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the Board of Directors are hereby invested with 
full power and authority to treat with and conclude any negotia- 
tions, or contract with the authorities of the Atlantic, Tennessee 
and Ohio Railroad Company, in regard to the rebuilding of their 
road, or its consolidation with the Charlotte, Columbia and 
Augusta Railroad. 

By Mr. Patterson : 

Resolved, That it shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, 
prior to each general meeting of the stockholders, to appoint a 
Special Committee of Three Stockholders to verify proxies, and 
report to such meeting the amount of stock represented. 

Adopted. 

Resolved, That a Committee of Ten Stockholders, other than 
Directors, be appointed by the Chairman of this meeting, to exa- 
mine the Treasurer's accounts for the year 1870, and to report at 
the next annual meeting. 

Adopted. 

( 

Colonel J. H. Rion offered the following resolution, which was 
unanimously adopted: 



21 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention are hereby tendered 
to Hon. J. V. H. Allen for the able and courteous manner in which 
he has presided; and to the gentlemen who have acted as Secreta- 
ries for the efficient and obliging manner which they have performed 
their duties; also, that the non-resident stockholders express their 
grateful acknowledgment to the citizens of Augusta for the hospi- 
talities already tendered and the festivities which they have pro- 
vided. 

By Mr. A. B. Davidson: 

Resolved, That six hundred copies of proceedings of the Conven- 
tion, together with the reports of President, Superintendent, Trea- 
surer, &c, be printed in pamphlet form for distribution, and be paid 
for by the Treasurer. 

Adopted. 

By Judge Kobertson: 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting of the stockholders of 
this Company be held at Columbia, S. C, on the first Wednesday in 
May, 1871. 

Adopted. 

There being no further business, on motion of Captain W. B. 
Stanley, the Convention adjourned. 

J. V. H. ALLEN, Chairman. 



C. H. Manson, ) Secretaries 
C. P. Hyde, ) secretaries. 



Immediately after the adjournment of the Convention, the 
Directors held a meeting in the hall, and unanimously re-elected 
Colonel Wm. Johnston to the office of President. 



BOAED OF DIRECTORS. 



WM. JOHNSTON, Peesident, Charlotte, N. C. 
A. B. DAVIDSON, Charlotte, N. C. 
J. HARVEY WILSON, Charlotte, N. C. 
RUFUS BARRINGER, Charlotte, N. C. 
PAUL QUATTLEBAUM, Lexington, S. C. 
C. D. MELTON, Columbia, S. C. 
JOHN FISHER, Columbia, S. C. 
EDWARD HOPE, Columbia, S. C. 

F. W. McMASTER, Columbia, S. C. 
W. R. ROBERTSON, Winnsboro, S. C. 
J. H. RION, Winnsboro, S. C. 

J. J. McLURE, Chester, S. C. 

G. J. PATTERSON, Chester, S. C. 
A. B. SPRINGS, Fort Mills, S. C. 
W. E. JACKSON, Augusta, Ga. 
JOSIAH SIBLEY, Augusta, Ga. 
JOHN J. COHEN, Augusta, Ga. 
S. D. HEARD, Augusta, Ga. 

J. V. H. ALLEN, ex-officio Mayor, Augusta, Ga. 

C. H. MANSON, Secretary, Columbia, S. C. 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To the Stockholders of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad 

Company. 

Gentlemen: In compliance with the request of your President, 
"that I report to this meeting the character and condition of the 
work under construction," I respectfully submit the following: 

The work at present in process of construction is a bridge over 
Savannah Kiver. 

The approach to the bridge on the Carolina side was completed 
in February; it consists of trestle 3,000 feet in length, and averaging 
fifteen feet in height. 

The approach on the Augusta side, from the foot of Washington 
street, has been completed more recently; it is of a most substantial 
and durable character, and is formed by two parallel walls of 
masonry, filled between with gravel, which forms the road-bed. 

The bridge, including the short span over Bay street, will be 
1,002 feet long; requiring for its support two abutments and five 
piers. 

One abutment and three piers are built; the second abutment is 
very nearly finished, and the foundation of the fourth pier is within 
three feet of the surface of ordinary water; the fifth and last pier is 
not yet commenced. 

The average height of the river piers is forty-five feet; the level of 
the rail, which will be five feet higher than the top of the piers, 
will be thirty-six feet above ordinary water; four feet and one inch 
above the track on the bridge of the South Carolina Railroad, and 
four feet and seven inches above the high water of 1840, the highest 
of which record has been preserved. 

The superstructure of the bridge will be a Howe truss, combined 
with an arch in the five river spans, each of which will be 186 feet 
in length. In the short Bay street span of seventy-two feet in 
length, the arch is unnecessary, and will be omitted. 



24 

About three-fifths of the timber required has been delivered, and 
nearly all the iron is received. 

The span over Bay street is up, and two of the river spans are 
nearly ready to be raised. 

With no unforeseen cause of delay, I think your trains may cross 
the bridge in August. 

H. F. BARD WELL, 
Chief Engineer Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad. 



25 



« 




ss 




ft3 




C3 




s 


OS 


l~-i 


CD 


o 


00 


JS 


rH 


O 


j,_ 


r*? 


«, 






S 

$ 


^3 

e 

o 


*8 

s 


C3 


cs 


^ 


w 






(3 


o 








^ 


S> 




gj 


O 


^ 


co 


"« 




SS 


%. 


C3 


CO 

OS 

CO 

g 

a, 




,k 


o 


N 






co" 


C* 




~ 


o 


CO 


s 




"w 


*W 


£ 




<3 


53 




co 


*W 


C^ 


C3 


g 


e 


s 






C3 


■SI 


«s 




e 


CO 




r< 








V 


9 


■S3 


n 


s 




CD 


^3 


s 




CO 


53 


3q 


C3 










CO 


i 


■M 


<J 










o 




CO 




S 




S 









b* 


to 00 


o 






cm 


cd as 


as 






C5> 


■** ^H 


00 






CO 


CD 00 


GO 


•soKmavg; ao ssaoxg; 


O 

as" 


O^ CD 

io co" 








tH 


rH rH 


b- 






*S©= 




rH 








oo 


CD tO 


as 






CO 


rH O 


to 






tH 


as co 


CD 






CM 


tO rH 


as 


•sareuiaaxg; ONiivaaMQ 


cm 


CD rH 

cd" to" 








00 


CO O 


CM 






=68= 




rH 


CM 

■6% 






to 


T— 


CO 


as 






CD 


cc 


O 


^H 






CO 


or. 


00 


to 






CD 


CM 


as 


00 




•iviox 


co" 


b- 

T— 


b- 

oo" 


b- 

co" 






CO 


tc 


rH 


o 






rH 




CM 


^H 






=68= 






■€& 




GO 




O 


00 






CO 




CO 


CO 






<M 




CO 


to 




•saoanog hoki]^; 


rH 

as 

=68= 




CM 

rH 


CO 
CD 

rH" 

=68= 




o 


b- 


rH 


00 






tO 


cc 


CD 


■** 






cm 


Tfl 


O 


b- 


• 


•siivh 


rH 
00 


CO 

to 


CM 


CD 


Ul 




rf 


CO 


cd" 


-*" 


& 




=68= 






rH 

=68= 


ft 

M 














tH 


to 


to 


xH 




-^H 


b- 


b- 


as 


ft 




o 


oo 


b- 


CD 






o 


rH 


as 


rH 


•saaeKassvj 


CM 
b-? 


CM 

© 


o 
cm" 


to 
as" 




»o 


CO 


r-i 


as 


H 




68= 




rH 


rH 

=68= 




CO 


as 


b- 


as 






CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 






GO 


o 


CD 


to 






CO 


b- 


to 


CD 




•SiHOiaa^ 


CO 

o 


as 




oo" 






b- 


rH 


o 


00 






■98= 




rH 


rH 

=68= 




P3 


p4 


. pS 








p4 


p4 


« 






•savo^[ 


d 


4 


-J 








«« 


^ 


o 








d 


d 


d~ 





Pi 

<£ 
O 
H 



O 
m 
ft 
< 

d 



o 



lc 



26 



c* 




s 




^ 




"S3 












cs 




« 








rO 




























6 




<1? 


OS 


sg 


CO 


o 


00 


'S 


tH 


w 




^ 


1—1 


'O 


CO 


<v> 


s- 


r< 






s 


rg 




!0 


<i-> 




^ 






o 



H-*(N05-H 
HOtHOM 
CO CD CO COO 



0Q • fl • 

H • 2 " 

QQ '. £ . 
& ■* • 

w ' *h : 

Q_l • © • 

ij !>>ft • 
?N c3 <, • 

^ ©fig 

w a be© 

P4^ o © 






© o ^ 



2 ■** ao 

ra « c 



■■a 

o g 

H 



h3 

O o 

ll 

^ g* 

W 2 

pd^ o 

P3'3 * 
PhPh 

&H 

CD 



CO CO 

coo 
coco 



© 

.A 

§° 

17 o • d 
3 • ft 

M « "■ S 

H O . 3 

0*J3 • oq 

Ms-I • © 

3 ft s 
H P " * 

M =4 h © 



cd tH oq co 

CO CD OS rtf 

t-i oso 10 

CO C^tHtjT 
t~ CO 1— 1 
CO 



A -5 

<IH 3 
o^ © 
MHtS 

81 



GO . rj 

"^ ftS 



© 



■3-SS 
«:2 * 



03 £ £j ft 

S b« * ° 

eg q Q-*j> «m 

"J; Hh en s-i 

PmPhPli 



w 

nl'd 

PQ g 

if ft 

n ° ° 

H 



t- O CO 



5! 2 

ira o 



CD ► 

00 -. 

tH OS 

CO 

-co 



Hi? 2 • 

Sfi|f|s 



o oq © o ' o 00 ' 

1 2 8-3*1 S3 



Z © Q 

S S§S2 

<d © Q On. 

o 



?a 



Ph gPn Pm g 



d © 



CO 

0,DJ 

o^ o 

Eh go 

O 
H 



•a ^-2 



p^ a .75 



O 83 
U 

wag 

wo 
o 

H 



t*-.-* 3 © 

fl S fl 

C3 E= S 

O to 

'SOS 

^ * rf 
O 



■Soft 
S^o.2 

-•g-'S 
o 



.5 E 3 



27 



3 




.5^ 

<! "-C 

P_l 00 <D 

g.2 S .. 

<3 , e8 88, •'3 

J o o o-gS 



t-o 

CQ o 

001 



<M c- 

CO lO 
(MOO 



"© TPh 3 .1! 








CO 

00 


COC-GO 
S5 00O 





10 




10 


IO <M O 
COOlrH 


CO 


CO 
CO 
<M 


CO t-1-1 
COCO 






o 



Hi Q 



02 

Q 

K 
o 

g«^2 

O osT!o 

t— 1 O * _ 

O 
H 



88 ;» 2 >> 
r .2S,o 



2- 

s a 

OS 

.as 



al* 

So 



■-s © 

:gg 

• bod 

S o3 O 

O — ' 

■ * s 

3^2 
o 



a "3 <d 

o3 © j-c 

a IS 

Oflg 
o m 

-*= 2 OD 

•" o o 



_.^+= *GO 

H^J.2^ 

QM^ g 

•3^£©-E 

O 
H 






(MO 

as co 
coco 






-£o» as oj oqO a> • m .72 m 

^tl OP! O^O^Oq-pO 



3 ?*6 









28 



28 



t3 

ft* 



oo as co 

as aoco 



oo oo omwcq 
ocs oo ONHCO 
co io o to OhOH 



3 



<S P 



o 



■^ 



:o 



o ; :*h 









:« 



•^■73 
C S fl 



Hs3op5^^ • © . fl - © 
-^ s - 1 -- 2 .J O 'Srt ^ o 

..l8*»s^ia.. 

itfoQ 0£;o2 O 0«i &W <1Qfi 



too 



E300 

5 o o 



«^» 

ftp- 

^O o 
33 § 

0Qfl M 

fl 



02 

a & 

«o ® 

M 



CO 

Q 
£5 

O 
cq 

H^ a 

fl 



o : g^ 

fQOfi 
fl 



CO 



oo 

O CO 

coco 



fl 



fl :p5 :a : £« :"§«< : g ..: : 
« !fl :d|fl :j| fi - ;S* :-S| ! 

^ 2d -rf Jtf^ -*S d JLA Jtf Si " 

r i o^ © . *o o-™ a o s 



ga 



j O o^ fl'o ©^fl 



ao rMoo2.S+= , a2SoflS < 1c3 

O O -« £ W h] Ou 



dp. 

SO 
Sfl 

S3 1 " 

0«3 
Ofl" 

o 



p^, I coo o 

c3 g <mo o 

g o too O 

&Q coo o 

o*a oco «o 



03 



: fflfl 



9 U « 



Oi-^O 



b 5 !•§ s f» 

BOO »o,Q 

O fl 



O 



29 



a q to 



CDCDt- 
10C(N 



• iH ■*-" .„ 

S ^S 

o g o 

A ft 



Eg if 
_ p ? 

op 




30 



Dr. 



Balance Sheet, December 31, 1869, Charlotte, 



ASSETS. 



Eoad and Equipment. 
Keal Estate 



Southern Miss. E. E. bonds. $20, 984 25 
Greenville and Columbia E. 

E. bonds 1,892 50 

North Carolina E. E. bonds. 330 00 
State South Carolina bonds. 200 00 



C. & S. C. E. E. stock $62,300 00 

C. & A. E. E. stock 22,525 00 

A. T. & O. E. E. stock 20,000 00 

No. Ca. E. E. stock 5,500 00 

King's Mountain E. E. stock. 4,000 00 



Due from sundries. 



Due from Eailroads on Tick- 
et Account $14,519 24 

Due from United States Gov- 
ernment 4,709 68 

Due from Express Company. 1,906 53 

Due from Agents 13,227 39 

Cash on hand 42,776 73 



Operating Expenses, 



Interest Account $23,652 20 

Intereston Coupons, not paid. 39,539 00 
Interest on Bonds Payable.. 13,090 86 



Discount on Stocks. 
Discount on Bonds . 



9,603 53 



23,406 75 



114,325 00 

262 78 



77,139 57 



105,113 05 



76,282 06 



14,512 19 
4,162 00 



$4,722,075 56 



224,737 63 



200,069 30 



15,146,882 49 



Columbia, S. C, December 31, 1869. 



31 



Columbia and Augusta Railroad Company. 



Cr. 



LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock — 0. & S. 0. 

E. stock $1,541,900 00 

C. & A. R. R. stock 1,016,277 77 


1,204,116 65 

335,320 03 

23,934 70 

200,801 22 

164,223 24 

1,576 41 

13,308 26 
39,539 00 


$2,558,177 77 


Bonds payable $1,198,000 00 




Fractional bonds 6,116 65 








Bills payable 




Due to United States Government and 

State of South Carolina for taxes 

Due to A., T. &0. R. R 

Due for railroad iron 




Due to sundries 




Due to other companies on Ticket Ac- 
count 




Interest coupons 


$1,982,819 51 






Earnings 


218,798 03 

285,957 37 

99,129 81 




Due to Columbia and Augusta Railroad 
Company 




Due to Charlotte and South Carolina 
Railroad Company 


603,885 21 


- 




$5,146,882 49 



C. H. MANSON, Treasurer. 



32 



C. H. Manson, Treasurer, in Account Current ivith the Charlotte 
Dr. to date of Consolida- 



1869. 
Dec. 31 



To Balances from last year, viz 

Cash 

Agents 

Southern Express Company. . . . 

United States Government 

Other r 



To Earnings. 

From Jan. 1, 1869, to 
July 31, 1869, viz: 
Freights — propor- 
tion of this road. . .$70,338 33 

Proportion of other 
roads 74,839 19 



Passengers — propor- 
tion of this road. .. $57,200 44 

Proportion of other 
roads 25,738 03 



Mail service, 



To Property Account 



To J. R. Anderson & Co. 
Due them , 



To Bonds Payable. 
Issued 



To Fractional Bonds Payable. 
Issued 



To Cotton Account 

To Bills Payable. 
Issued 



To Taxes Account. 



To Real Estate. 

Amount as asset of this Comp'y 
transferred to C, C. & A. R. R. 

To Interest Account. 

Discount on purchase of C. & 
A. R. R. stock, &c 



$3,402 69 

4,160 20 

462 74 

4,901 54 

757 32 



145,177 52 

82,938 47 
4,812 50 



$13,684 49 



232,928 49 

912 38 

1,200 00 

330,000 00 

1,947 20 
55 85 

188,186 37 
7,367 14 

9,603 53 

254,373 51 



33 



and South Carolina Railroad Company, from December 31, 1868, 
tion, July 31, 1869. Cr. 



1869. 
Dec. 31 



By Operating Expenses. 

From January 1, 1869, to July 
31, 1869, viz: 

Maintenance way 

Conducting transportation. . . 

Motive power 

Maintenance cars 

Machine shops 

Loss and damage 

Over-charges 

Taxes 



By Freight Exchanges. 

Paid other roads their propor- 
tion of freight earnings for 
1869 



By Ticket Exchanges. 
Paid other roads 

their proportion of 

passage earnings for 

1869... $25,738 03 

Less unp'd balances. 1,000 13 

By Freight Exchanges. 

Paid other roads ba'ances for 
1868 



By Ticket Exchanges. 

Paid other roads balances for 
1868 



(5) 



By Bonds Payable. 

Amount redeemed 

Amount assumed by C, C. & A. 
R. R. Company 



By Richmond and Danville R. R. 



By Bills Payable. 

Amount retired 

Amount assumed by C, C. k A. 
R. R 



By Fractional Bonds Payable. 

Amount redeemed 

Amount assumed by C, C. & A. 
R. R 



$24,488 11 

7,879 35 

3,384 08 

4,182 75 

28,055 26 

350 19 

284 23 

15,600 41 



51,000 00 
620,500 00 



219,526 24 
283,501 86 



2,499 97 
6,864 19 



$84,224 38 



74,839 19 



24,737 90 



1,766 61 



4,599 28 



671,500 00 



568 15 



503,028 10 



9,364 16 



34 



C. H. Manson, Treasurer, in Account Current with the Charlotte 
Dr. to date of Consolidation, 



1869. 
Dec. 31 


To C. & A. E. E. Company. 

Ledger account transferred to 
0., 0. & A. E. E. Company as 
an asset of this Company 




$263,262 84 




To C. & A. E. E. E. Stock. 

Stock dividend 15,419 shares, at 
$25 00 per share 


$385,475 00 
46,900 00 






Transferred to C, C. & A. E. 
E. Company, as an asset of 
this Company, 1,876 shares, at 
$25 00 per share 


432,375 00 




To Stocks in other Companies. 
Transferred to C, C. & A. E. 

E. as assets of this Company, 

viz: 

A.,T. &0. E. E. stock 

N C E E stock 




20,000 00 
5,500 00 
4,000 00 






King's Mountain E. E. stock . . 

To Bonds Eeceivable. 

Transferred to C, O. & A. E. E. 
as assets of this Company, viz: 

A., T. &0. E. E. bonds 

So Miss. E. E. bonds 


29,500 00 




40,000 00 

20,984 25 

3,000 00 

1,892 50 

330 00 

200 00 






C. &S. C. E. E. bonds 

G & C E. E. bonds 






N C. E. E. bonds 






State of S. C. E. E. bonds .... 

To C. & S. C. E. E. Stock. 

Transferred to C, C. & A. E. E. 
as an asset of this Company, 
6 shares 


66,406 75 






600 00 




To Cost of Eoad and Equipment. 

Transferred to C, C. & A. E. E. 

as an asset of this Companv. . 




2,289,338 39 




To Confederate Accounts. 

C. & A. E. E. stock reduced. . . 
State of South Carolina bonds. 
Sales bank bills 


12,500 00 

200 00 

96 90 

100 00 

• 






Amount claim refunded 


12,896 90 



35 



and South Carolina Railroad Company, from December 31, 1868, 
July 31, 1869.— Continued. Cr. 



1869. 
Dec. 31 



By Interest on Bonds Payable. 
Amount funded, &c 



By Discount on Bonds Payable . 
By Confederate Claims 



By Stock Dividend. 

Paid in C. & A. E. K. stock, 

By Interest Account. 

Paid interest on loans 



By Interest Coupons. 
Amount paid 



By Annuity 



By C. & A. Eailroad. 

For advances to that Company. 

For hire of trains and hauling 

material 



By Land Account 



By Bonds Eeceivable 



By Capital Stock. 

15,419 shares stock, $100 each, 
assumed by C, C. & A. E. E. 

By C. & A. E. E. Stock. 

Original subscription reduced. . 

Purchase of 789 shares, cost. . . 

Discount on do. at credit of in- 
terest account 

Discount on purchase of 16,000 
shares, in 1868, at credit of in- 
terest account 

Stock dividend, 6 shares, re 
ceived by this Company , 



By C, C. & A. E. E. Company. 

Assets transferred to that Com- 
pany, viz: 

Cash $60,360 07 

Cost of C. & S. C. 
Eailroad 2,289,338 39 

Eeal estate 9,603 53 



$8,274 17 
35,254 67 



12,500 00 
6,135 00 

13,590 00 



240,000 00 
150 00 



2,359,301 99 



$3,829 32 
9,811 71 
4,557 04 

385,475 00 

19,690 00 

24,754 60 
125 00 

43,528 84 

157 50 
200 00 

1,541,900 00 



272,375 00 



36 



C. H. Manson, Treasurer, in Account Current with the Charlotte 
Dr. to date of Consolidation, 



1869. 
Dec. 31 



To C, C. & A. B. E. Company. 
Liabilities of this Company as- 
sumed by that Company, viz: 
Capital stock . . . $1,541,900 00 

Bonds 620,500 00 

Fractional bonds. 6,864 19 

Bills payable.... 283,501 86 
Due to A., T. & 
O. E. E. Co.... 264,424 40 



Amount expended by 
pany for account of 
pany, viz: 

Maintenance way ac- 
count 

Conducting transpor- 
tation account 

Motive power ac't. . . 

Maintenance cars act 

Machine shops acc't. 

Freights and passage 
account 

Interest coupons ac't 

Interest on loans ac't 

Loss, damage and de- 
duction account. . . 

Taxes 

Confederate claims. . 



that Com- 
this Com- 



$1,893 74 

1,884 05 
1,258 26 
2,505 68 
3,662 65 

3,946 77 
2,228 63 
1,087 00 

111 41 

13,787 32 
3,775 28 



,717,190 45 



36,140 79 



,753,331 24 



37 



and South Carolina Railroad Company, from, December 31, 1868, 
July 31, 1869. — Continued. Cr. 



1869. 
Dec. 31 


A., T. & 0. R. R. 

bonds 40,000 00 

So. Miss. R. R. 

bonds 20,984 25 

0. & S. C. R. R. 

bonds 3,000 00 

G. & C. R. R. 

bonds 1,892 50 


$66,406 75 
77,000 00 






N. C. R. R. bonds 330 00 
State of South Ca- 
rolina bonds. .. . 200 00 






C. & S. C. R. R. 

stock 600 00 

C. &A.R. R. stock 46,900 00 
A., T. & O. R. R. 

stock 20,000 00 

N. C. R. R. stock. 5,500 00 
King's Mountain 

R. R. stock 4,000 00 






C. &A. R. R. Led- 
ger account 263,262 84 


263,262 84 
80,300 00 

6,189 47 






Sundry ledger accounts being 
for bonds deposited as collate- 
rals on loans 






Collections for that Company fur 

account this Company, viz: 
Freights and passage. $3, 323 93 
Mail service 687 50 






Confederate claims... 100 00 

Taxes 1,090 26 

Through passen'r line. 884 03 
Revenue stamps 103 75 


$2,852,461 05 




By A., T. & O. R. Pw. Company. 
Amount of this account liqui- 
dated 


78,118 41 
266,174 40 






Balance of this account assumed 
by the Charlotte, Columbia 
and Augusta Railroad Co 

By Reconstruction of Track. 
Expended for this account 


342,542 81 







85 21 



38 

C. H. Manson, Treasurer, in Account Current with the Charlotte 
Dr. to date of Consolidation, 




Columbia, S. C, December 31, 1869. 



39 



and South Carolina Railroad Company, from December 31, 1868, 
July 31, 1869. — Concluded. Cr. 



1869. 
Dec. 31 



By Catawba River Bridge. 
Expended for this account. 



By Cost of Equipment. 



By Balances. 

Due from agents 

Due from United States Gov- 
ernment . c 

Due from other roads 



#350 43 

576 46 
14ii 89 



$143 50 
10,991 90 



1,079 78 



5,888,336 03 



C. H. MANSON, Treasurer. 



40 



De. 



Statement of the Condition of the Columbia and 



STOCK OF THE C. & S. C. K. CO. 
Balance per statement, October 1, 1868 . . 
Since sold and transferred 



CONSTRUCTION OF ROAD. 
Balance per statement, October 1, 1868 . 
Since added 



BILLS PAYABLE. 

Retired since October 1, 1868 .... 
Assumed by 0., C. & A. R. R. Co 

BONDS PAYABLE. 
Assumed by C, C. & A. R. R. Co. 



CHARLOTTE & S. C. R. R. CO. 
balance (Ledger account.) 
Assumed by G„ C. & A. R. R. Co 



CAPITAL STOCK. 
Assumed by C„ C. & A. R. R. Co . . . . 
Discount on consolidation 



C, C. & A. R. R. Co., (Ledger account) 

Interest coupons 

Columbia and Augusta Railroad stock. . . 



TAXES. 

Paid in 1868 $43 43 

Paid in 1869 943 92 



Maintenance way. 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION. 

For 1868 $6,503 43 

For 1869 33,215 12 

LOSS, DAMAGE AND DEDUCTIONS. 

Paid in 1868 $2 00 

Paid in 1869 662 36 



Motive power 

Due from contractors and others 



$75,500 00 
8,800 00 



888,884 82 
1,487,251 46 



107,630 95 
6,587 93 



1,016,277 77 
127,034 73 



$66,700 00 

2,376,136 28 

114,488 88 
949,000 00 

263,262 84 

1,143,312 50 

285,957 37 

2,776 38 

20,925 00 

987 35 
339 46 

39,620 55 

664 36 

1,498 30 

23,864 97 



$5,289,534 24 



Columbia, S. C, December 31, 1869. 



41 



Augusta Railroad Company, December 31, 1869. 



Cb. 



CHARLOTTE AND S. C. R R. STOCK. 
Transferred to C., C. & A. R. R. Co 



COST OF ROAD. 
Transferred to C, C. & A. R. R. Co 

BILLS PAYABLE. 

Balance, October 1, 1868 

Since issued 



BONDS PAYABLE. 

Balance, October 1, 1868 

Since issued , 



C. & S. C. R. R. LEDGER ACCOUNT. 

Balance. October 1, 1868 

Hire of Freight, Passenger and Construction 

Trains for 1868 

Advances from that Company, 1868 

Hire of Freight, Passenger and Construction 

Trains, &c, 1869 

Advances from that Company, 1869 



CAPITAL STOCK 

Balance, October 1, 1868 

Since added 



Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Ledger 

account 

Property account 

Profit and loss 



FREIGHTS AND PASSAGE. 

Receipts, 1868 $10,716 08 

Receipts. 1869 $48,189 44 

Mails, 1869 3,534 37 51,723 81 



Less balances due from agents, &c. 



Discount on consolidation of capital stock. 
Due to contractors and others 



$112,488 88 
2,000 00 



410,500 00 
538,500 00 



175,853 25 

37,583 11 
6,297 44 

35,254 67 

8.274 17 



1,027,273 00 
116,039 50 



62,439 89 
913 35 



$66,700 00 
2,376,136 28 

114,488 88 

949,000 00 



263,262 84 



1,143,312 50 



161,616 61 

4,134 95 

11,743 00 



61,526 54 

127,034 73 
10,577 91 



>, 289, 534 24 



C. H. MANSON, Treasurer. 



42 



I 5 
S 

I 



1 

3 5* 






& 



1 I 

CD no 






^ 



I 






g 

I 
«8 



cc GO 

1 £ 

I 1 
.gffi. 



^ 






J) 1} <^ 



•NOXOKIXai | ^ §o S S 3 



'viamanoo 



osus eo cs i-i 
cn>^ io-* cm 



•020 a 



•iVAvsroaiy 



t— CO OS co OJ 

00 00 lO CO 00 

01 ©lO'*'* 



OHOaSKKIIAi 



>0 O (O O <M 
CO "O CO b- ■* 

m co io t^ 1 ^ 
th co'^Tofco" 



SH l iS5iov r rg 



TH t-r-i CO t- 

IOCSI CO CO CO 

■* «o eo -*n ■<* 



•aaxsaHQ 



>O00(M^H 
00 CO t- CO L— 

o *a oo fc-eo 



WtSNHt- 

t- ic eo C3 03 
c- o « eo co 

**co of y-i of 



sialic xao^ 



COtH tH 



axxoaavHQ 



>_ COCOOOI 

t- t-* CO E~ 

OS O CO o o 

hoVooT 



« a s s a 

^ O O © 



•Aioaaog; 
xaaaaiQ 



•uoxoNixaT; 



I CO O! rH OJ eo 

•VHOTircOQ |&£g£5; 
I co go' id eo"o" 



OC~i 

•iVAiaoaijj J ^ ^ J2 ^ 2 



oaoasHKi^ 



OI CO 1-1-* lO 
O CO rt 00 i-i 

cocqioiao 



I eo co »o o tH 

SH^xsaovag «° ^ » <= «> 



"aaxsaHQ 



00 O C- 00 CO 

t~ o oi co eo 

ic eo io C2 oo 



•aaiH aooy; 



c— os t— OS t— 

CI CT3 00 OS C- 

HHHMCO 



| <& iiHH 



axxoaavHQ 



t-I CO O W CO 

Ht>«Ot-H 
WONCDO 



ill s i 

p ^O O CD 



43 





1 

I 








r> 






r.^ 


, * 






'■g 

S 





o 

CO 


Ki 






s 






^ 




43 


s 




Oft 







s 

01 


BO 1 




00 


<^> 










W 


T- 




Ri 


a 




<3 


5ss 




«j 


CO 




r< 


£ 




0> 


?•> 










JO 


bH 




fei 






§ 


0a 
3 







O) 




*, 


£ 




Sfc 


bn 











§?> 




rh 






^ 


CO 




^ 


18 




w 






^ 


^ 


A 


e 


C3 




03 


V J 


H 


^l 





'A 


if 


to 
3 


O 


to 


T1 


1 


^ 


s 


1 


CO 


« 


to 






■<S> 


"to 








OS 


~ 


C5s 


g 


to 


s 


00 




3 


on 


"§ 


-So 


rH 




^Q 


rH 

CO 


OS 


^ 


s. 


W 


cv. 


to 




.S? 


1 


1 


b 


§ 


m 


g 


^ 

q 


«l 


< 




rH 


^ 


co 


<§ 


f 




O 


to 


S 




Ptj ^ 





I rH i-l (35 OS fc- O 




OS COOSCOCO 00 




OOXOHOO CN 


•sivxox 


OS C" IO — ■" CO fc- 

O CM rH O CO H 




00" rH os"os co" ! rH 




iH CO rH CO rj 






<» 


1 ^ 




• -o 


O 






t- 




t- 


•saxvxg 




00 




00 


aaxixVfi 












4© 








CO "* O) CO X 


1 




t>OOI>(NI> | rH 






»o 


•ssatraxa 


0(DIOI>0 O 




*» rH<N*H 


i co 

r 




Hcqioow 







rH CO CDUOCC 







OCOOH* 


rH 


•vxsaoiiy 


CO rH CO O CC 
CO COCO rH <M 


OS 




rHiocoooic: 






ea 


^ 




«d rH !>• rH W 


I «o 




e»co cocc 


t- 


•aiiiA 


HHOJIOCC 


1 CO 

HI 


-axmvH£) 


©rllMH t- 






O rH lO rH I> 


rH 




rH rHrH rH U: 


CO 


•asaoH 


HIMtHM> 
rH CO rH CO *C 


CM 


aNij 


10 CO CO CO CC 


1 CM 




W rHrHr- 


h 




oocoooa 


rH 




co cm cm 10 c- 






cm co co t- oc 


lO 


S.SOXSNHOf 


rHrH C~OS r- 

rH cn co coo: 


rH 

rH 




m 


۩ 




O 30 CO t-CN 


co 




COrH O 00 l> 


CM 


•ONia-jg 


rH CM 00 C-OC 

OlOiOCOCT 


CM 


aoaiy; 


rHCOCOCMr- 


CM 




COrH t-CO CN 


rH 




100<MtH« 


00 




00 OS CD Id CC 


lO 


aaaiAsaxvg; 




(35 




■e» 


^ 




t-CM O O rH 


O 




oi>ooa 


O 




ca cn rH co cc 




•a/rciAsaaTi 


CM CNHO OS CM 
■€»CN T-HrH CO 


OS 




co co rHrH er 


1 O 




100x00: 


CO 


•avotioh 


i>coQocr 


1 00 


xaaaii£) 


t>omocc 

<6H(Mrtn 


1 10 

CC 


no 












n 












H 




** h 




O 


5=0 CL43 > O 






<3oc 


C 


^ 


P 





•sivxoj, 



I W5 



00 CM t^ CO >0 

00 co o lOrfi 

IOHOHO 



I -rH CD CM CO >0 



•saxvxg 
aaxiKfi 



^ 


CO 

t~ 

co 

OS 





o 10 t- CO 00 

O rH 00 CNJ rH 
CO rH CO »0 I " 
rH C~rH O 1 

of CM co' in co" 



'vxsnony 



•aaaiA 
-axiNVHo 



OOrHlOOSO 

00 rH rH 00 rH 
^rHrH rH 



•asnofj 



S t N0XSK[H0f 



•ONiaag 
aoaijj 



aTiiAsaxvg 



•aaaiAsaai SS5c?c§S 



I OS 

I* 



OS CO OS c-00 

00 rH CO OS rH 

CO OS lO tfl CO 
uo"t~ CO OOrH 



OCMOrH OS 
01 1>00 l> CO 
CO CO CO «S CO 



OCO COO CO 
r-i 00 OS 00 CM 

rH HHOITH 



CO OSrH C CO 
COrH COO 00 
m rHrH CM CM 



I rH CO — < ^ 
I CO rH CM t- 
I CM CO CM CM 



P2o^§ 

rs 5To c co 



rH rH rH W 



P^ 



H 



44 

C. & S. C. R. R. — Statement Showing the Receipts at Each Agency from 
ductors, and Sales of Through Tickets by Corresponding 

FREIGHTS. 



MONTHS. 



January . 
February 
March . . . 
April 

May 

June 
July 



< 








PQ 




p 
hi 


o 
M 


o 


o 


Q 


ft 


$8,792 41 


$ 


8,321 06 




5,824 41 


347 15 


4,533 95 


131 19 


3.522 96 


107 29 


4,477 96 


66 97 


4.885 26 


58 21 


$40,358 01 


$710 81 



$386 69 
789 43 
823 85 
741 26 
370 34 
398 74 
298 62 



$3,223 99 
5,707 53 
3,191 67 
2,224 50 
1,321 14 
1,490 90 
1,527 11 



808 93 $18,686 84 



$281 58 
769 37 
903 78 
555 23 
225 96 
222 75 
286 52 



245 19 



PASSENGERS. 



MONTHS. 


< 


H 


o 


so 
M 
o 
o 






« 


i 


O 

n 


S ' 






3 


H 


03 


M 


H 




p 


tS 


53 


o 


02 




^ 


Q 


g 


< 


W 




o 




J -1 


hi 


M 




O 


P=i 


£ 


w 


O 


January 


$3,067 05 


$210 90 


$457 25 


$104 00 


$586 75 


February 


6,267 75 


99 25 


423 70 


102 75 


560 25 


March 


6,788 10 
4,068 25 

2,781 25 


114 65 

64 75 

99 75 


331 10 
266 00 
303 00 


54 30 
58 25 
32 50 


460 75 


April 


318 50 


May 


389 50 




3,225 75 
4,204 50 


86 00 
139 00 


348 00 
376 00 


50 25 
80 75 


476 00 


July 


481 25 








$30,402 65 


$814 30 


$2,505 05 


$482 80 


$3,273 00 



45 

Freights and Passengers, also embracing Receipts from Express, Con- 
Roads, from January 1 to July 31, 1869, Inclusive. 

FKEIGHTS. 





£ 


00 


h 




$ 

W 

M 




& 


a 


O 


CO 

cc 
8 




5 


M 


B 


M 


W 


<) 


w 


o 


PS 


< 


Ph 


H 


W 


o 


o 


i 


M 


O 


Q 


Ph 


fo 


Q 


w 


H 


$5,948 11 


$1,370 41 


$331 89 


$5,945 25 


$306 64 


$26,586 97 


9,077 77 


2,292 99 


163 11 


5.248 04 


272 11 


32,641 41 


9,568 42 


3,403 49 


388 12 


3,960 31 


413 74 


28,824 94 


5,724 47 


1,796 95 


78 90 


2,319 54 


386 49 


18,492 48 


3,173 77 


1,195 27 


80 23 


2,241 74 


452 27 


12,690 97 


3,346 77 


951 56 


45 68 


1,733 87 


411 22 


13,146 42 


2,987 79 


758 91 


88 11 


1,546 30 


357 50 


12,794 33 


139,827 10 


111,769 58 


$1,176 04 


$22,995 05 


$2,599 97 


$145,177 52 



PASSENGERS. 





CO 




CO 


CO . 

PS ft 
PS 3 


CO 

PS 


fl 


a 


h 


PS 








hi 

3 


o 

l5 


o 

O 

p 






M 


H 


w 


Q 


CO Z 


9 


o 


PS 


<j 


jg 




H 


o 


O 


w 


o 


!< * 


O 


m 


fr 


o 


O 


m 


H 


$135 25 


$123 00 


$3,466 49 


$2,639 85 


$1,157 40 


$11,947 94 


99 75 


79 00 


2.898 75 


2,297 55 


1,146 69 


13,975 44 


93 50 


59 00 


2,119 75 


1,843 20 


3,440 43 


15,304 78 


125 25 


47 00 


1,988 25 


1,549 60 


1,649 61 


10.135 46 


96 00 


67 75 


1,830 25 


1,706 45 


2,370 73 


9,677 18 


141 51 


57 00 


1,928 75 


1,529 25 


1,780 24 


9,622 75 


198 00 


99 75 


1,666 75 


2,138 95 


2,889 97 


12,274 92 


$889 26 


$532 50 


$15,898 99 


$13,704 85 


$14,435 07 


$82,938 47 



E. R. DORSEY, 

General Freight and Ticket Agent. 



46 



^ 6 

CD 'S 

& s 

■o; ^ 



a 



CD 



1^ 






535 



3 






S3 



"fe. 



o 
CO 






£ 


"© 


53 


1 


x 
e 


3 








© 


co 


5^, 


CO 
1 




CO 


1 




d 




CO 




^ 


as 
3 


•-o 


ftq &H 


53 




•10 

1 


to 

o 


rj 


15 




k, ^ 






t£ Oi OS CO 00 

(MCOOOiiO 
03 OJ CO HO 

OS fc*- lO CM lO 

^rH CM CM CM 



-xg; ihsihh:^ ^o Noixaojojjj sikhi 
sv savoy; aaHiQ aiv d NOi>ia:o<ioaj 



tH co tH b- lO 

CO CO "^ CO CO 

■^(MHOOO 

t>OTflHt- 

HCOHCO(M 

CO CO* tH* CO* go" 
4& H (M H H 



•siHoiaa^ aviox 



CO CM O rH 00 

05t>tCrHCO 

O CM TJH CO CO 

X* tH Ci Oi CO 

rH CO xH CO ^ 



•sa,iviQ aaxiMfi 



■ssaaaxg; 



CO CS O lO lO 
O«0l0t>0 
lO ^JH O O 255 



•siETOiaa:^ 



Ht>OCOOi 

tO CM tH CO CM 

OJOHCOCO 
lO CO CO 0S_r$i 

t^ CO* CO* CO* -H 
rH CO -tf CO H^ 

4# 






glial 

B ® O O 0J 



47 



•sivxox 



CO CO t-b- OS 

OtMI>CO(M 

©' ©" oo~ cn co~ 
tH' l> b* t> GO 



a 

CJD 
< 



m 
i— i 

« 

e 

S3 
H 

OQ 
OQ 
<J 

o 

Ph 



•siivj\[ 
<mv saasNassvj 'iHeiaaj noak 
iirvdwoQ avoaiivy; vxsnony <jnv 
viawnnoQ 'anoiavHQ ao xoixaoaoaj 



HC5C5om 

CO fc- OS CO CO 

cm t~ go oo as 

IC csf t> CO iO 

cm «* tj< "^ ia 



GO 00 GO CO IC 



•XMVdEHOQ 

avoaiivy; visnoav cmv viamaioo 
'axxoiavHQ ox OKinaooy Koixaoaoaj 



co o t-h co oo 

QOWNHCq 
O »0 CO xtf CD 

tH co" rH CO' Ci 
H(MCq<N(M 



'saoNVHO 
-xg; xsraoix £0 Koixaoaoaj aiaHx 
sv savoy; aaHXQ aiv <I Noixaoaoad 



OHCONI> 
O -* CO CO rH 

t^r-T oaf ci 



•saaoNassvj; ivxox 



00 <M t- CO lO 

00 CO O lO tH 
lOHlQHO 

i-Tio bTcsfcsf 

CM CO CSJ CO "# 



'saxvxg aaxitffi 



•saaoKassvj 



os fc» t^ co co 

oo co oo -* cs 

oo cm © co io 

CO CO CO iO -rH 

IQHIOHO 



S 4J ft <£> CD 

S © C5 O CD 

«3 0QO£ifi 



^3 

q 



48 



a, ^ 

O 

5> *? 



2 o? 



S CO 

eg > 

-< >»o> 

I -2 

CD T-H 

3 > 

?§ i 



g « 



^: 



C^ r< 


s 


^ 






g 


S 


^ 


rS? 




o 


C3i 


* 


s 


£ 


o 




^ 




KJ 


ES 


-to 

s 


1 


<2"> 




g 


^ 


ft 




no 


C 


3q 


P 


| 


§ 


^ 


03 




v. 


k; 


£ 


ci 


af 



g 

.o 

o 

I 



so 






avoaiivyr YNiioavQ nxnog cmv 
aixoiavHO ox oniiihoo y moixhxmohj 


HtOrHOOCOHO 
CO CO o «o O ■>* O 

CO CM CM 00 CM tO •*$ 

0<Ma^CO(NI> 
os ©_ o OOCO b- CO 

CO io cm" OC CO cd co" 

<— 1 T-H 1—H 


CO 
CO 

GO 

CO 
CO 

o" 
b- 

m 


•saoKVHOxg; xhdieh:^ 
a(M savoy; JiaHXQ aiv^ NOixaoaoHj 


CD JO O C tH h CO 
CO O ^H CO OS O CO 

CO OS <M CO CO l— I o 

COH^tHC(N(M 
CO CO CM CO CO x)H ^ 

CM" b-^ CO' Os" lo" CD" CD" 

tH tH t— 1 


CT5 
i-H 

OS 
CO 
00 

b- 


•sxhoieh^ ivxox 


t- i— i -s*h co b- cm co 

OS ^ OS ** OS -tH CO 

CO i-i ^ CM O CO tH 

CO "rH 00 OS OS ^H CS 
IO CO CM r)H CO i— 1 b- 

co' cm" oo" oo" cm' co' cm" 

CNCOCNHrtHrt 


CM 

iO 

b- 
b- 

t— 1 

1—1 


•ssaa<ixg; wojij 


•^H^CStxMO 
CO rH b- TH CM cm vo 

CD CM CO CO CM r-l b- 

~l>rH00lOHlO 

CO CM tH CO tH tJH CO 


b- 

OS 

os 

OS 
iO 

CM" 


•sxHOiaa^ ROJI.J 


co o o os o o co 

CO CO CM OS b- CM 00 

OQHlOCOlOffl 
00 CO r-4 O CO CO CO 

(MCOtHH(MI>^ 

co cm" oo oo" cm" cm" cm" 

CM CO CM tH r-l i— 1 i— 1 


b- 
b- 

>o 

CM~ 

T-H 


CO 

m 

H 

O 


January 

February 

March 

May 

June 

July 





49 



M 
«{ 

M 

ft 

H 

o 

H 

QQ 
CQ 
<J 

Pm 
O 



•sivxoj, 


$39,222 41 
47,304 35 
44,817 22 
29,315 44 
23,055 65 
23,456 67 
25,756 75 


Os 
rH 

00 

CM 

°l 
CM" 

CO 
<M 


*siivj\[ aNV 
saaotfassvj 'sxHQiaa^ Hona iNva 
-hoq avoaiivy; VNinoavQ Hxaog 
any axxoiavHQ ao Koixaoaosd 


tH CO rH OS lO CO CM 
CO lO ^ tH O CO CO 

O 00 CO OS 00 CM GO 

HO5H00(NCO^ 

rn as^o cm co cm 
co"" co" co" co" to tJH ' co" 

CNtMNHHHH 


b- 
CM 

co_ 
cm" 

CO 

rH 

۩= 


•siivjfl 


OOOOOOO 
iO iO *Q lO O lO iO 

fc- b- b- b- fr- b- fr- 

00 00 CO GO 00 00 GO 

CO CO CD CO CO CO CO 


O 
CM 

rH 
00 
rH" 


avoanivg vrartoavQ Hxnog <inv 
hxxoihvhq ox oNiriHooy Noixaoaoaj 


CO b- b- rH CM CN CM 

go co co co ua as 00 
as 00 co co 00 as co 

rH CO rH id lO rH GO 
00^ CM b- b- tH OS rH 

00" 00" as co" t^" co" aT 


rH 

I 

O 
CM 
b^ 

lO 


•saoNVHOxgr xasoij, 


rl t> H lO CO CO O 
Hl>^HCDO0H 

00 CO rH CM 00 CM CO 
CM 00 CO 00 rH b- GO 
rH CO lO CO CM CO O 

tffiOlO co" cm" cm" CO* 


CO 



00 
CO 
b- 

lO" 
CM 


•sasoxassvj wtoaj 


rH ^H 00 CD GO iO CM 

OS rH b- rH rH b- OS 

b- lO rH iO b- CM rH 

^t>OCOI><NI> 

as as co th co co cm 

rH CO" CO" O" OS* Os" cm" 
v-l rH rH rH rH 
33= 


b- 
rH 

GO 

CO 

°^ 

cm" 

00 


w 

H 

O 

7 


January , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July , 





a 

CD 
CJO 

< 



H3 

■+3 



50 

Bonded Debt of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad Com- 
pany, December 31, 1869. 



C. & S. C. E. E. BONDS, Viz : 

Due January 1, 1866 

" 1867 

" 1869 

" 1870 

" 1871 

" 1872 

" 1873 

" 1874 

" 1879 

" 1880 

" 1887 

" 1888 

" 1890 



C. & A. E. E. BONDS. 

Due January 1, 1890 

C, C. & A. E. E. BONDS. 

Due January 1, 1895 

Fractional Bonds 



Total, 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
16,500 00 
28,000 00 
29,500 00 
27,500 00 
29,000 00 
34,500 00 
34,000 00 
16,500 00 
21,000 00 
55,000 00 



8295,000 00 

551,000 00 

352,000 00 
6,116 65 



$1,204,116 65 



C. H. MANSON, Treasurer. 



Columbia, S. C, December 31, 1869. 



MASTER MECHANIC'S REPORT. 



Master Mechanic's Office, Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta, R. R., 

Columbia, S. C. 
C. Bouknight, Esq., Superintendent Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta 

Railroad. 

Sir : During the year, the work done in this department is as 
follows: At the beginning of the year, there were twelve locomo- 
tives in active service; nine -in good order, two in running order, 
one in bad order, one rebuilding, and new one building, making 
fourteen in all. In August, during this year, the two locomotives 
bought from the W. and A. R. R., were placed in service — the 
Conoseen in running order, and the Augusta in good working 
order. The Wm. Johnston, bought from the Danforth Locomotive 
Works, was placed in service 1st of December; the Jas. W. Osborne, 
^bought from the same works, was placed in service on 13th Decem- 
ber. At the end of the year, there were fourteen locomotives in 
active service, and two (the lighter ones) lying up in good order; 
one rebuilding, near completed; the one building also well ad- 
vanced. 

From the above, you will see that there were only two locomo- 
tives in the shops at one time. 

During the year, including the one building in the month of No- 
vember, coach No. 2 was exchanged even with King's Mountain 
Railroad for their locomotive Wm. Wright, in bad order. There 
were at the last of the year thirteen locomotives in good, reliable 
order, three in running order, one rebuilt, near completed, and the 
one building, as before stated, well advanced, and the Wm. Wright, 
making in all nineteen; two of them, the Chester and Taylor, are 
too light for regular service. 

For any details as to cost, repairs, &c, I refer you to locomotive 
report. 



52 

At the end of the year, there were six first class coaches, five 
second class coaches and five mail and baggage cars in active ser- 
vice and in good order; two of the first class, two of the second class 
and three mail and baggage cars were built during the year. 

In the Freight Department, there were at the end of the year 
seventy-nine box cars in active service, and two box cars completed 
and ready for service; eight stock cars and forty-nine flats, and six 
flats built, awaiting trucks. Of the above, twenty box cars were 
built during the year, and twenty flat cars, making in all one hun- 
dred and thirty-six cars in active service at the end of the year; of 
the seventy-nine box cars, five are in the Green Line service. 

I beg to ask your consideration to the incapacity of the round or 
engine house, the machine shop, tools, &c. The shop was originally 
calculated to accommodate two locomotives for repairs; and when 
more than that number were necessarily brought in, the round 
house was used for that purpose, which is inconvenient and unprofi- 
table, in consequence of some of the most important tools, such as 
boring mill, hydraulic press, lathe, &c, being placed in the end of 
shop that was formerly vacant. There can only be one locomotive 
in the shops for repairs at once, without very much interfering with 
the progress of other important work. The round house cannot be 
conveniently used for repairing, as there are nineteen locomotives, 
and only twelve stalls, and very often there is not accommoda- 
tion for all the locomotives laying over. The stock of tools iir 
machine shop has been very poorly able to keep up with the 
demands during the year. Having increased the car building and 
the general repairs nearly double to what it was formerly, it is 
necessary that the capacity of the shops should be increased, and so 
arranged as to accommodate three or four locomotives at once for 
repairs. There are a few tools very much needed, in order to expe- 
dite some of the most important work, namely: one large wheel 
lathe, one small turning and screw cutting lathe, one fourteen-inch 
shaping machine and one axle lathe. It would be necessary, how- 
ever, to enlarge the shops, before all of the i above tools could be 
conveniently arranged. Our Car Department has very good tools, 
such as saws, planers, shapers, &c. A large car morticing machine 
could be used to very great advantage, as that class of work is done 
entirely by hand. 

As regards car erecting shop, it is unnecessary for me to say any- 
thing, as the necessity for a good one is frequently seen by you. 



53 

Our oil cellar is entirely incapable of holding the necessary supply 
of oil; and, considering the danger of keeping combustibles in wood 
buildings, I would recommend the building of another adjoining the 
present one, of the same size. 

For any particulars, I refer you to separate reports for the differ- 
ent departments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEO. D. KLINE, M. M. 



SUPEEVISOR'8 EEPOET. 



Columbia, S. C, January 15, 1870. 
Mr. Bouknight, General Superintendent Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta 

Railroad. 

Dear Sir: Please find statement of operations and material used 
in this department on your road, for the month ending December 
31, 1869: 

4,577 cross-ties, average cost % 31 

1,525 strings, 7x7x18 feet 

12 kegs of spikes 

1,100 feet of passenger platforms, Southern Division 

20,000 feet Graniteville, Pine House, Johnston's, Ridge 

Springs, Batesville, cost 125 00 

Number sectionmen 27, average cost per month 37 75 

Number Laborers 132, average cost per month, including 

rations, at $5 per month 16 50 

Number pump hands 15, average pay per month, including 

rations 17 50 

Road carpenter and gang, cost $120 00 

Respectfully, 

B. F. BURNS. 

Number of Sections — Commencing at Augusta, Ga. 
No. 7 — Hamburg, 4 hands, 4 rations. 
2 — Burns' T, 6 hands, 6 rations. 
3 — Warehouse, 7 hands, 7 rations. 

One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 
4 — Pine House, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 
5 — Johnston's, 5 hands, 5 rations. 
6 — Ridge Springs, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 
7 — Batesville, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 
8 — Gilbert Hollow, 4 hands, 4 rations. 
9 — Lexington, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 



55 

10 — Blanton, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

11 — Columbia, 7 hands, 7 rations. 

12 — Lightwood-Knot, 6 hands, 6 rations. 

13 — Sharp's T, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

14 — Doko, 5 hands, 5 rations. 
One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 

15 — Watkens', 5 hands, 5 rations. 
One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 

16 — Simpson's, 6 hands, 6 rations. 

17 — Winnsboro, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

18 — Adger's, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

19 — Blackstock, 6 hands, 6 rations. 
One Pump, 1 hand, 1 ration. 

20 — Green's Shanty, 6 hands, 6 rations. 

21 — Nick's, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

22 — Smith's T, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

23 — Duncan, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

24 — Eock Hill, 5 hands, 5 rations. 

25 — Fort Mills, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

26 — Morrow's, 4 hands, 4 rations. 

27 — Charlotte, 4 hands, 4 rations. 
Total hands 134. 
Pumps 8. 
January 17, 1870. 

Columbia, S. C, April, 1870. 
Mr. C. Bouknight, General Superintendent Charlotte, Columbia and 

Augusta Railroad. 

Sir: Please find a partial statement of material and operations 
on the line of your road, for the year ending December 31, 1869 : 

15,558 gains Ties, 10x10x9 feet. 

38,269 flats ties, 7x9x9 feet. 

192 kegs of spikes. 

1 tank at Beach Island, Road Hamburg supplied by pipes from 
Shoult's hill. 

Platforms in Augusta. 

Truss work at Graniteville removed from the South-east and 
placed South, and since thoroughly repaired. 

200 feet of passenger platform at Graniteville. 

300 feet of track at Miles' Mill. 

575 feet of track at Cheatam's Mills. 



56 

300 feet of passenger platforms at Pine House. 

300 feet of platforms at Johnston's. 

300 feet of platforms at Bidge. 

300 feet of platforms at Batesville. 

9,000 feet of track at Graniteville. 

700 feet of track at Arthur's. 

40 feet of platforms for passengers over street bridge at Colum- 
bia. Thoroughly repaired. 

600 feet of track at Hoffman's Lumber-yard. 

1,000 feet of track at Woodard's. 

150 feet of platforms at "Woodard's. 

1 fine well and tanks at Woodard's. 

200 feet of passenger platform at Cornwell's T. 

1 small cotton platform. 

400 feet of passenger platforms at Chester. 

150 feet of passenger platforms at Smith's. 

Steel Creek Bridge has been overhauled, and is now in good re- 
pair. 

1 small cotton platform at Morrow's. 

700 feet of track in Charlotte yard, for the purpose of shifting 
through freight. 

Heavy stone anchors have been built at each end of Catawba 
Bridge, to prevent it, the bridge, from moving longitudinally. 

Sixteen iron rods have also been placed up the spans for the same 
purpose — two inches by forty-one feet, with heavy swivels, so they 
can be tightened up at any time. 

Bidge Springs, Batesville and Leesville wells have all been sunk 
from eight to fourteen feet deeper. 

Also, the well at Lexington has been sunk eight feet deeper. 

Four section houses have been built. 

One at Blanton's, or Guilyard's Mills. 

One at Johnston's. 

One at Pine House. 

One at Burns' T. 

Eleven miles of track from Graniteville to Leesville. 

400 feet of track at Union Shed, in Augusta. 

Side tracks at Augusta. 

B. F. BUKNS. 



57 



o 




























b- 


















00 


















iH 


























&b 


4 ab 








T-T 








.2 


1 .2 








r 

1 


o 






'3 
a 
s 


os ■*" 2 as 
so Sm 2 «o 

00 5 J5 00 






O 

o 






CJ3 


*j ^ ^r 


csb <ab tib c 








a 


5a a so 

O 05*o OS ° 


. a . a . c 
*S "a 'c 


'S CD 


1 






§1 
*3 


Sf'SgSg 

Q +3 .J; Or- 


! 2 2 t 
i 


P a 


4 










-cW h'?n3^ 


t-' 1h* »- 


3 9 


jJ 








i 2S*-S« , Hffl-SS , 2 r 2'S 


5 pc 




CO 

I 4 








o .c 
o fcn 


Sa^ k: 2 t3 »d no n: 

a§o^pooc 


U 

CD -i_- 


O 

■73 
O 


^ 








O a> E 


<B n O CD © c 


o o c 


a c 


o 








OfcttQaSOfcQoOCCPSO 


'•'S 










o 


• l-H 






• 1 "-• 


§ 










c- 


. . . f 










I "* 


<3 


•Hovg; 


£0 


ISOQ 




1-1 


. . . o 










• 1 OS 

• 1 iQ 


1 










• • • CO 










■:\U 


^ 










b- (M 


• • • 00 








• a 


O 


Ip 










rH C 


• ; ; CM 








• cc 


• rH 


£) 










■<* a 


' • 'rH 








• a 


l^ 


«r 


•isoq nviox 




coo: 
O c: 


• • • iO 

* * * rH 








• r— 


O 
CO 


■*^i 
























? 










OS*r- 


'. '. Ico 










> co" 








«& 












i— i 


b 




















• «j» 


6 








• <m ir: 


• • -00 








• OC 


CO 










tH o: 


• • os 








•10 


• os 












oo cc 


• * -io> 








• IT. 


• eo 


-to 


•nviaajivj^ 


£0 


ISOQ 




CO cc 

T-l OC 










• it: 


o 


V 










'. '. '. o 










1 CO* 
t-l 


^ 








• JO i> 


. . . o 








• c 


CM 


§ 








. t-c 


• • • CO 








• T— 


• CM 


O 








•IO(S 


• • 'oo 








•^ 


• O 


fti 


•aoayrj 


£0 


ISOQ 


« OS CO 


. . . o 








• «c 


o 

rH 


| 








I r4" 












I CO* 


6 








=۩= 












• «©= 


is 




























* 




























^s 




























s 


. 


























<3 


fc 


























1«i 


O 


















• »4 

. . 03 




OS 


I 


M 

o 

02 












* . mm 

. . *H '- 

. . 03 S 




% 


: :© 

* -»» fli 

OC 


* 

* 


«4 

6 

13 

a 

03 

w 

o 




ft 






bo tic a 

os eS o5 


Lj .OQOC 

a si a a a e 


a a f- 
e3 -w at 

o.2'5 
qcqgo: 


o3 e* 








ooc 


OOSSSJ; 


^4»: 


a 


Q 
$ 








o o c 
pqcacc 


«4H «*-! <*-" <♦- 

M M *3 -^ -^ ■*- 

o O^^-S^ 

paw cuojPhq. 


p c 

io3 « 

i- v. 

OC 








Haarcnji 


2 


c 

CM 


G 
r- 


CM rirH C 
CO <M 


CM 


T- 


00 r-i 


i— 


rH r- 


(M 

CO 



58 






:2"S» 

• g S S3 

•,3 bo&o 



•aoiAsag 
aaoKSHKOQ xshij xaHA\. 



tH . ic Jh o th cs J5 qo _:E2 



; oo «o ,io 



t-t ..' 00 <-> 00 )_, „ ^ 

-2 S aj fl 



■,_( © <Ji 



•• * tr is © 



, ft ©"5 S. 

■<!Ob<!' 



!m<iqa- 



© fl 9 
ftfQ **" 

sr© o 



•isoo ivKioiao 



v 

*, 



aq' 



o toaccoooTjooo 

O 'N000500H10K5 0J 

O '(DI>0^100ffilNNO 

O^ | t^ ! °„ Q0 ,. l£ *. .. 00 „ , °„ O ^ 

oo" ■ t-^oo oo t> t- ■*' t-^<M~(?q to 



•siaaH^ 3.0 XBOiajj 



tHIOWO^W^'^iOtHiOiOiOOOtH'*'* 



•smoj mi ihoism. ! « : « cq 



■*OOSt-COI>OOlN>OM>OWCOI>©© 



*ft 

S3 o 
Op5 



O O 



c3 o3 

DO 
ODOO 



S • fcn 

O ceo o 
■ S 4 £ 



o<j iddd^d^ 



oS 

OS. 

. ftpp 

°aaoQ 

-*aa* 






© r o © © 
KOP5oi« 



•h 0'2 H h ^ O 0"-.S h h ^ 
S*-iS •®©«M«t-iSC©©© 

P Qfl.Q , "aoJDb£)P.S..Q$-t&D&flbJO 
©o3© .00«3s3©0000 



.© .© .©© .©© .©© . . . 

s bC+3 bOaa &C fcC+3 bX) bC+3 &C b£ ^a ^» ^ 






.«. s a 



s © 
P s 



©rj3 

as 



PhH 



o 00 Q 

OowS • © • ■ S -5 .-fl-fl § O 



2fl 






North Carolina State Library 
Raleiql 



59 



"T3 13 . . . 

bC Q©©©©©©©©©©©0©©© 

a • r o r CT3 r o'^ r o'r! , T3i3 r a'rs v ,/o 'O ts 

2.0.9000000000005000: 

'3 ^ 0' , c$rd p d'di3n3i3 r S , 3 , d r d s ^j ^ n3 ' 
^2^!flOOOOOOOOOOOflOOO, 
©J3200O0OOO00OO3O0O 



•anrifl aa<j xsoo 




: O 
: !-h 

, 1 

•i-Hfc-00 


; 

ih so : 

OJ OJ CO CO * © »C iH i-l OJ *H tH • 




•Kfljl saaijfl 3.0 sasnin^ 


:Hoeqooft<*H«»ooo»Hoio ■ 

■* 'HfflOI>(NINMOmO00CCI>10 05TH • 

t- ;t-oio-*cocoooi>qHQoi>ocoo«o • 

CO '.ZD t» ■* OT !>■*»«'* CO of CO Iff 00 of r-T | 
i-H i-H i-l 1-1 OI CM OJ OJ Ol t-1 i-H i-l . 

• 


© 
0" 
10 

OJ 


•6981 «oj xsoq iviC\L 


(NOOlOOlOONOOt-iJfOtOOONttltDINOOO 
OJr-<COaOCO©<OOOCO'*COOlC5i-('*lOOlC£>?0 

OlflOOTHlO©OOIO«D«(OHt>rtl>00950 
OOCOi-li--l01UO©srit~<X>010icOi--l©)uOCO-*01 
C-- OSi-H O^Ol SO CO U9 OS T-i i-^t-1 tH CO Ttl -* i-l tH tH 
ofco" r-Tr-TcO i-T 


CO 

00 
CO 
«* 

r> 



•o^> 'axsv^ 'iiq ao xsoq 



"ivraaxvH ao xsoq 



ioomi> coo os ■«* »a © 10 tH eo ear© eo as co 

CO 1C OJ © C» Ol Ol CO -rH CO U0 CO t> -* ©Ol O) Ol 
tO-* C5rt(DH cq lO iH 



•aoffVT; jo xsoo 



1-1© t~©O5r-(C0»O 



'aaaivaaa acxmg aoiAsas 
aaoNanwoo xssi£ Kan^ 



1-1 CD 

^00- 



S5hb 



:© 



S2«j •* 

>. £> bo ■ S 



co co 
JSco 



10 






3 s 

i © 

n 



12 

§| 

b£> 

Is 

© ,2 

8a 

© >> 
•as 



g 



O 
Q 
O 
H 

m 

H 



H 



© o 

00 « 

2-* 

fcD 
aj q 
Q,g 

02 © 

•S§ 

©o 
g a 

o «8 



5* 

O © 

£.a 

©'So 

a a 
^ . 
■si 

n od © 

be 1 . 
gj<* 

<J«o_ 



•* 



• • • 


• 




• • « 


• • • • 


• 


.•"*. :* : 


•••. * • 


• • ■ • 




•• • • 




• • • • 


• 


• • • 


• •• 


• • •• 


,/:!• 


• 


•• •• 


> • • • • 


• • 


> • • 


• • 


» • • • 


• • « 


• • • • • • 


» • • 


• • < 


• 


• • • « • 


• • • • • • • 



GC 385 C4792p 
1870 

Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad 
Proceedings of the stockholders of the C 



3 3091 00244 7142 



DATE DUE 


















































































































































G/1YLORD 






PRINTED IN U.S. A. 



\tlord 



PAMPHLET BINDER 
ZZm Syracuse, N. Y. 
Stockton, Calif. 



NORTH CAR0L1N1ANA 
RESTRICTED 



/ 



385 
C4792p 

1870 

Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta 
Railroad Company 

Proceedings of the stockholders at their 
annual meeting 










ft 



' 



B